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Curriculum

ESL Classes meet Monday through Friday on the campus of the University of Kentucky. All classes are highly interactive. Students are graded on such activities as homework, written reports, presentations, in-class participation, tests, and quizzes. Students recieve 20 hours of instruction a week in Listening/Speaking, Reading, Writing, and Grammar. Generally, students are either placed in a morning schedule and do not attend classes on Wednesday or an afternoon schedule and do not attend classes on Friday.
 
Students who begin at CESL below Level 1 should expect to study for at least 18 months. Students who begin in levels 1 or 2 should expect to study for at least 12 months. Students who begin in levels 3 or 4 should expect to study for at least 8 months. Students who begin in level 5 should expect to study for at least 4 months. Since learning a language is extremely difficult, repeating a level is common; students should not be discouraged by this. If needed, students have a bridge to university study through the English for Academic Purposes classes, which are credit-bearing. 
 
Basic English
Basic English is for students with no working knowledge of English. Students will learn basic vocabulary and English structure. This level is designed for small classes for more one-on-one teacher interaction. It can also run concurrently with Level 1 classes in place of most-needed skill(s). Study hall/private tutoring is also available for students.
Level 1 (Low-Beginning)

Grammar classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students learn to recognize and produce grammar structures in highly-controlled settings with familiar non-academic topics. Students are introduced to the American university classroom setting and culture; this also includes becoming familiar with university email and learning management systems such as Blackboard.

Reading classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students learn to recognize the main ideas of texts on familiar non-academic topics. Students should be reading leveled texts at approximately 100 words per minute. Students will visit the library and learn about library resources (how to locate graded readers, how to check out a book, how to print).

Writing classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students learn to write simple sentences and short paragraphs on one controlling idea. Students write basic journal entries on concrete topics to build fluency.

Listening and Speaking classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students learn to ask and respond to basic questions for information and clarification in conversations and begin to draw inferences. Vocabulary should be the primary focus for students. Students will improve their pronunciation individually focusing on intelligibility. Students give highly-structured, simple presentations of up to 1 minute in length; topics can include a personal introduction, roleplay, or describing a photograph.

Level 2 (High-Beginning)

Grammar classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students focus on producing grammar structures with familiar non-academic topics.

Reading classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students learn to differentiate between main ideas and supporting ideas of texts on familiar non-academic topics. Students should be reading leveled texts at approximately 100-150 words per minute. Students will visit the library and learn about library resources.

Writing classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students work toward writing process and expository paragraphs about familiar topics. Students also use the basic writing process including prewriting, writing first drafts, proofreading, revising and editing based on direct and indirect teacher correction and basic word-processing. Students write informal emails focusing on register and form and journals to build fluency.

Listening and Speaking classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students work toward conversing in basic social situations but without complete control of structure and pronunciation. Students will improve their pronunciation individually focusing on intelligibility. Students give simple presentations of 1-2 minutes in length.

Level 3 (Low-Intermediate)

Grammar classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Level Three is the bridge between basic English instruction in Level One and Two and academic preparation in Levels Four and Five. It emphasizes production, fluency, and accuracy.

Reading classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students learn to read and identify the main idea, supporting ideas, and details in descriptive and expository texts. Common activities are reading newspapers and a collection of stories or a novel to gain cultural literacy; students may identify irony, foreshadowing, and other elements of fiction in level-appropriate texts. Students will predict the content of a text using previewing skills (titles, subtitles, and captions), use scanning skills to find answers to reading comprehension questions, use new vocabulary in discussions and writing, and apply new concepts from a text to personal experience and world knowledge. Students should be reading leveled texts at approximately 150-200 words per minute. Students will visit the library and learn about library resources.

Writing classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students learn to write essays using the basic writing process (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, highly-structured peer editing) while using computer/word-processing skills. Students will take their essays from rough drafts to polished, typed final drafts. Students write informal to formal emails focusing on register and form and journals to build fluency.

Listening and Speaking classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students will improve their pronunciation individually focusing on intelligibility. Students express opinions on a variety of personal and academic topics using details & examples and give 2-3 minute presentations.

Level 4 (Intermediate)

Grammar classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Level Four is the first academic preparation level. Students begin to synthesize information from all skills. Students use common academic technology. Students learn the academic definition of plagiarism and cheating.

Reading classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students learn to read and identify the main idea, supporting ideas, and details in descriptive and expository texts. Common activities are reading newspapers and a collection of stories or a novel to gain cultural literacy; students may identify irony, foreshadowing, and other elements of fiction in level-appropriate texts. Students will be introduced to figurative and literal meaning. Students will predict the content of a text using previewing skills (titles, subtitles, and captions), use scanning skills to find answers to reading comprehension questions, use new vocabulary in discussions and writing, and apply new concepts from a text to personal experience and world knowledge. Students should be reading leveled texts at approximately 200-250 words per minute. Students will visit the library and learn about library resources like how to conduct academic research.

Writing classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students write major essays to analyze/critique a text and construct an argument; they learn how to formally document sources and learn the academic definition of plagiarism and cheating. Students write using the writing process (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, peer editing) while using computer/word-processing skills. Students will write at least 2 drafts of their papers. Students write formal emails focusing on register and form and journals to build fluency.

Listening and Speaking classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students will improve their pronunciation individually focusing on intelligibility. Students converse with fluency in everyday situations and on academic topics and give 3-5 minute presentations.

Level 5 (High-Intermediate)

Grammar classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Level Five is the second academic preparation level. Instruction focuses on language and culture appropriate to an American university.

Reading classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students learn the academic definition of plagiarism and cheating. Students learn to analyze academic texts. Common activities are reading newspapers and a collection of stories or a novel to gain cultural literacy; students may identify irony, foreshadowing, and other elements of fiction in level-appropriate texts. Students will use scanning skills to find answers to reading comprehension questions, use new vocabulary in discussions and writing, and apply new concepts from a text to personal experience and world knowledge. Students should be reading leveled texts at approximately 250-300 words per minute. Students will visit the library and learn about library resources like how to use databases for academic research.

Writing classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Language and culture appropriate to United States educational institutions are developed. Students continue to work in the computer lab, when appropriate, with their writing instructor. Students use the writing process (prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, peer editing) while using computer/word-processing skills and will write 2-3 drafts of their papers. They write formal emails focusing on register and form and journals to build fluency.

Listening and Speaking classes meet for five hours of instruction per week. Students will improve their pronunciation individually focusing on intelligibility. Students converse with fluency in general academic topics and have authentic community interaction. Students also give highly-developed, 5- to 7-minute presentations.

Level 6 (Advanced)

Level 6 consists of 3 core classes and a variety of rotating electives. The core classes address the immediate needs of students in reading, writing, and listening/speaking; grammar is integrated into each class based on the needs of students. Electives are for students’ subjective needs. Ideally, students will matriculate to the university and require no further English instruction at the end of Level 6.

Previous electives include: American Cinema, Business and Professional Communication, iBT TOEFL preparation, Vocabulary, and the American Essay. Students will select 1 elective class which meets for 5 hours a week.

Reading and Writing is a core class of Level 6. The class meets for 10 hours a week. Students will focus on the reading and writing skills needed to be a successful undergraduate or graduate student at the University of Kentucky. Besides researching and writing academic papers, students can benefit from learning to write a professional CV/Resume and statement of purpose. Students should be reading leveled texts at approximately 300-350 words per minute. Students will visit the library and learn about library resources.

Listening and Speaking is a core class of Level 6. The class meets for 5 hours a week. Students will focus on the listening and speaking skills needed to be a successful undergraduate or graduate student at the University of Kentucky. Students should be given the opportunity to visit an authentic lecture or class and speak to matriculated students. Students will improve their pronunciation individually focusing on intelligibility. Students will converse with fluency in everyday situations and on topics related to their chosen field of study. Students will also express their ideas and opinions with clarity in small groups and classroom contexts. The class culminates with a 5- to 7-minute presentation and an activity where students use their own notes to write a summary of a full-length academic lecture that has been presented in class and answer examination questions based on said lecture using their notes.

TOEFL
The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is given to all students in the Intensive English Program at the end of each session.
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